Leinster House Dublin

 

Leinster House – The Irish Parliament

BEST Accommodation Near Leinster House Dublin

Originally built for the Duke of Leinster in 1745, the building’s Kildare Street façade resembles that of a large town house. Bought by the Royal Dublin Society in 1815. The government obtained it in 1922 for parliamentary use and bought the entire building two years later. Visitors can arrange to tour the main rooms, including the Seanad chamber, and can sit in the public gallery in the Dáil.

Location: Kildare Street.

Admission: Free.

Telephone: (01)-6789911

The first meeting of Dáil Éireann took place in the Mansion House, the residence of the Lord Mayor of Dublin, in the afternoon of 21st January 1919.

The session lasted a mere two hours. They were two of the most momentous hours in Ireland’s history.

During this brief period the Dáil adopted a Constitution and approved the Declaration of Independence. By doing so the Dáil asserted a continuity of objectives with the leaders of the 1916 Rising in setting up a separate parliament, government and republic.

Ireland is a parliamentary democracy. The legislature consists of two Houses: Dáil Éireann and Seanad Éireann.

The functions and powers of the Houses derive from the Constitution of Ireland – Bunreacht na hÉireann which was adopted by the people in a plebiscite on 1 July 1937 and came into operation on 29 December 1937.

The house was originally known as Kildare House after James Fitzgerald, the Earl of Kildare, who commissioned it to be built between 1745-47. Fitzgerald set out to create the stateliest of Dublin Georgian Mansions to reflect his eminent position in Irish society.

It is told that the Earl had said that fashion would follow in whatever direction he led.

In succeeding, he caused an unfashionable area of the city to become a desirable one.

On becoming the Duke of Leinster in 1776 (Dublin and Kildare are in the province of Leinster) the house was renamed Leinster House.

The design

The designer of Leinster House was the architect Richard Cassels (or Castle), who was born in Hesse-Cassel in Germany about 1690. The design is characteristic of buildings of the period in Ireland and England.

It has been claimed that it formed a model for the design of the White House, the residence of the President of the United States. This claim may have its origins in the career of James Hoban, who in 1792 won the competition for the design of the White House.

Hoban was an Irishman, born in Callan, County Kilkenny in 1762, and studied architecture in Dublin, and consequently, would have had an opportunity of studying the design of Leinster House.

Hoban was an Irishman, born in Callan, County Kilkenny in 1762, and studied architecture in Dublin, and consequently, would have had an opportunity of studying the design of Leinster House.

A supporter of the United Irishmen, who advocated complete separation of Ireland from England, Lord Edward Fitzgerald, fifth son of the first Duke of Leinster, was arrested shortly before the insurrection of May 1798 and died of wounds received during his capture.

No doubt it was beyond his wildest dreams that many years later the Irish Parliament would be located in his family home.

The Royal Dublin Society

In 1815, Augustus Frederick, the third Duke of Leinster, sold the mansion to the Royal Dublin Society (RDS) for £10,000 and a yearly rent of £600 which was later redeemed.

The purpose of the society was to improve the wretched conditions of the people. Many important public institutions of the present day owe their origins to the RDS:

The Society made extensive additions to the house, most notably the lecture theatre, later to become the Dáil Chamber.

A number of historic events took place in Leinster House. The first balloon ascent in Ireland was made in July 1783 by Richard Crosbie from Leinster Lawn.

The Great Industrial Exhibition was opened on Leinster Lawn on 12 May 1853.

After the establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922, the Government secured a part of Leinster House for parliamentary use. The entire building was acquired by the State in 1924.

Today, Leinster House is the seat of the two Houses of the Oireachtas (National Parliament), comprising Dáil Éireann (the House of Representatives) and Seanad Éireann (the Senate).

Parliament in Ireland

There is nothing new about parliamentary assemblies in Ireland. The Normans, who began to settle in Ireland in 1169, were the first to give Ireland a centralised administration. Our legal system and our courts of law are, in large measure, inherited from them. So too is our legislature which is directly descended from the parliament which developed in medieval Ireland.

First there was…

The earliest known Irish Parliament for which there is a definitive record met on 18 June 1264 at Castledermot in County Kildare, although there is some evidence to suggest that the word “parliament” may have been in use as early as 1234. The pre-Union Irish Parliament continued to function for more than 500 years. The Houses of Parliament (Lords and Commons) later met in the first purpose built Parliament House in the world, on College Green in Dublin, which was constructed between 1729 and 1739.

Parliamentary assemblies took various forms down through the General Assembly of the Confederation of Kilkenny (1642-1649), the “Patriot Parliament” of 1689, and the independent Irish Parliament (1782 – 1800), popularly known as “Grattan’s Parliament”. These assemblies however all lacked the great principle on which Dáil Éireann was founded in 1919. This was that all legislative, executive and judicial power had its source in, and was derived from, the sovereign people of Ireland.

“Grattan’s Parliament” lasted just 18 years. The Act of Union 1800, which came into operation on 1 January 1801, created the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and united the parliaments of the two kingdoms. From then until Independence in 1922, Irish Members of Parliament held seats in the parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, with its seat at the Palace of Westminster.

The First Dáil (1919)

In the aftermath of the Easter Rising of 1916 Sinn Féin, the party founded by Arthur Griffith in 1905, was reorganised and grew into a nation-wide movement. Abstention from Westminster and the establishment of a separate and independent Irish parliament had long been part of Sinn Féin’s policy. The party contested the 14 December 1918 general election, called following the dissolution of the British Parliament, and swept the country winning 73 of the 105 Irish seats. Acting on the pledge not to sit in the Westminster parliament, but instead to set up an Irish legislative assembly, 28 of the newly-elected Sinn Féin representatives met and constituted themselves as the first Dáil Éireann.

The remaining Sinn Féin representatives were either in prison or unable to attend for other reasons.

The first Dáil met in the Round Room of the Mansion House on 21 January 1919. The Dáil asserted the exclusive right of the elected representatives of the Irish people to legislate for the country. The Members present adopted a Provisional Constitution and approved a Declaration of Independence. The Dáil also approved a Democratic Programme, based on the 1916 Proclamation of the Irish Republic, and read and adopted a Message to the Free Nations of the World.

On the following day, 22 January 1919, a private sitting was held which elected Seán T. O’Kelly as Ceann Comhairle (Speaker) and Cathal Brugha as President of the Ministry. The Dáil also approved the President’s nominations to the Ministry. Cathal Brugha resigned and Éamon de Valera was elected President of the Dáil (prime minister) on 1 April 1919.

Following the outbreak of the War of Independence in January 1919, the British Government decided to suppress the Dáil, and on 10 September 1919 Dáil Éireann was declared a dangerous association and was prohibited. The Dáil continued to meet in secret, and Ministers carried out their duties as best they could. In all, the Dáil held fourteen sittings in 1919. Of these, four were public and ten private. Three private sittings were held in 1920 and four in 1921.

The Second Dáil (1921)

During this time the formal government of Ireland remained with Westminster. In an attempt to settle the Irish question, the United Kingdom Parliament passed the Government of Ireland Act in December 1920. The Act created a separate state of Northern Ireland, consisting of the six north-eastern counties of Ulster, and proposed separate parliaments for Northern Ireland and Southern Ireland.

On 24 May 1921, elections were held for the return of members to serve in the new Parliaments. At a private sitting of the Dáil on 10 May 1921 the Sinn Féin representatives, who refused to accept the British concession of a Parliament for Southern Ireland, adopted a resolution declaring that the parliamentary elections which were to take place should be regarded as elections to Dáil Éireann.

All Sinn Féin candidates in the twenty-six counties were returned unopposed and took 128 of the 132 seats. The remaining four seats were filled by Unionists representing the University of Dublin (Trinity College). The Sinn Féin members, continuing in the footsteps of their predecessors, constituted themselves as the Second Dáil, which held its first meeting on 16 August 1921 in the Mansion House.

The Parliament of Southern Ireland (1921)

The inaugural meeting of the Parliament of Southern Ireland was held in Dublin on 28 June 1921 but, as Sinn Féin refused to recognise the parliament, only four members of the House of Commons – the University of Dublin representatives – together with fifteen senators attended. The Parliament met for a brief period and then adjourned sine die.

The Treaty between Great Britain and Ireland

Following the Truce between Britain and Ireland in July 1921, which led to the suspension of the War of Independence, peace negotiations between the two countries were initiated and culminated in the signing of the “Articles of Agreement for a Treaty between Great Britain and Ireland” on 6 December 1921. The Treaty provided for the establishment of the Irish Free State with jurisdiction over twenty-six of the thirty-two counties.

After a bitter and divisive debate, which began on 14 December 1921, the second Dáil approved the Treaty by 64 votes to 57 on 7 January 1922. Éamon de Valera resigned as President on 9 January 1922, and Arthur Griffith was elected President on 10 January 1922.

The Provisional Government (1922)

In accordance with the terms of the Treaty a meeting of “the members elected to sit in the House of Commons of Southern Ireland” was held on 14 January 1922. The meeting, which was attended by the pro-Treaty members of the Dáil and the four members for University of Dublin, formally endorsed the Treaty and set up a Provisional Government, under the Chairmanship of Michael Collins, to administer the twenty-six counties pending the establishment of the Free State parliament and government. The Provisional Government and the Government of Dáil Éireann, which was not recognized by Britain, existed in parallel and with overlapping membership.

Following the death of Arthur Griffith ( President of the Dáil ) on 12 August 1922 and the death of Michael Collins ( Chairman of the Provisional Government ) on 22 August 1922, William T. Cosgrave became both President of the Dáil and Chairman of the Provisional Government.

The Third Dáil (1922)

The Provisional Government called a General Election for 16 June 1922 and the new Dáil – the Third Dáil – held its first meeting in Leinster House on 9 September 1922. The Dáil, “sitting as a Constituent Assembly in this Provisional Parliament”, enacted the Constitution of the Irish Free State (Saorstát Éireann) Act 1922 on 25 October 1922.

The Irish Free State (1922 – 1937)

On 6 December 1922, a year after the signing of the Treaty, the Irish Free State or Saorstát Éireann came into existence. From then until 1937 the government or cabinet of the Irish Free State was known as the Executive Council, and the head of government was known as the President of the Executive Council. William T. Cosgrave was nominated to be President of the Executive Council, and the other members of the Provisional Government were nominated to be members of the Executive Council.

Article 12 of the Irish Free State Constitution created the Oireachtas: “A Legislature is hereby created, to be known as the Oireachtas. It shall consist of the King and two Houses, the Chamber of Deputies (otherwise called and herein generally referred to as “Dáil Éireann” ) and the Senate otherwise called and herein generally referred to as “Seanad Éireann” ).”

Leinster House Dublin, Parliament buildings, tourist attractions, free attractions Dublin, Irish History, Irish politics

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Guinness Storehouse Dublin

 

Guinness Storehouse Dublin, Guinness history, Guinness family, pint of Guinness

Guinness is as famous as the Island of Ireland; the Guinness tradition has survived through many turbulent events in Ireland’s long and often volatile history. Guinness is above all else an example of Ireland’s ability to produce world class products and services, a small Island that knows the value of customer service, be that on a global stage or more domestic frontage. The combination of quality locally sourced produce and home brewed Guinness from locally grown materials, makes Ireland a rich source of good living, and a destination for those people who enjoy quality food and drink.

GUINNESS HISTORY TIMELINE

1759 Arthur Guinness, aged 34, signed a 9,000-year lease on a disused brewery at St. James’s Gate, Dublin for an annual rent of £45.

1769 The first export shipment of six and a half barrels of Guinness stout left Dublin on a sailing vessel bound for England.

1775 Dublin Corporation sheriff sent to cut off and fill in the water course from which the Brewery drew its free water supplies. Arthur defended his water by threatening the party with a pickaxe.

1801 First record of brewing of Guinness variant West India Porter – made with higher hop rate to withstand long sea journeys (hops are natural preservative). Precursor of modern day Guinness Foreign Extra Stout.

1803 Arthur Guinness died aged 78 and his son, Arthur Guinness II, took over

the Brewery.

1815 Guinness well known on the Continent – legend states that Guinness aided the recovery of a cavalry officer wounded at Battle of Waterloo.

1821 Arthur Guinness II set down precise instructions for brewing a beer known as Guinness Extra Superior Porter – the precursor of today’s Guinness Original (known as Guinness Original in UK only, otherwise Guinness Extra Stout in Ireland and US)

1824 Guinness well known worldwide, first known advertisement printed in a

Dublin newspaper for “Guinness’s East and West India Porter”.

1833 Brewery became the largest brewery in Ireland

1850s Sir Benjamin Lee Guinness, son of Arthur Guinness II, took over the Brewery on the death of his father. Sir Benjamin Lee became a Member of Parliament for Dublin City and also served as Lord Mayor of Dublin.

Among his charitable deeds, he contributed £150,000 towards the restoration of St. Patrick’s Cathedral, Dublin.

1862 Guinness trademark label was introduced – a buff oval label with the harp and Arthur Guinness’ signature. The Harp was registered as a trademark in 1876.

1868 Benjamin Lee Guinness died and his son Edward Cecil took over the Brewery.

1869 Under Edward Cecil, the size of the Brewery doubled to over 50 acres and spread north to bound the river Liffey to accommodate new Brewery buildings linked by an internal railway system.

1886 Guinness became the first major brewery to be incorporated as a public company on the London Stock Exchange. It was the largest brewery in the world with an annual production of 1.2 million barrels.

1893 Robert Louis Stevenson brought supplies of Guinness to Western Samoa and wrote about drinking a pint while recovering from influenza.

1890s Edward Cecil appointed the first Lord of Iveagh and established the Guinness and Iveagh Trusts to provide homes for the poor in Dublin and London. He made substantial contributions to Trinity College Dublin and Dublin hospitals. His brother Arthur landscaped St. Stephen’s Green,

Dublin and gave it as a gift to the public. 1898 “World traveller” appointed to report on quality and sales of Guinness in overseas markets in North and South America, Africa, Far East and Australia.

1909 Guinness brought to the frozen wastes of the South Pole. Sir Douglas Mawson, the Australian explorer, left some Guinness behind at his base camp, which was discovered by anot Mawson, the Australian explorer, left some Guinness behind at his base camp, which was discovered by another expedition in 1927.

1927 Rupert Guinness succeeded his father, Edward Cecil, as Chairman of the Company.

1929: 2 million pints of Guinness are sold a day. First ever Guinness advertisement with the slogan “Guinness is Good For You” published in the British national press. This was soon followed by advertisements featuring the cartoon characters created by John Gilroy. His famous series of posters of the distraught zookeeper and his mischievous animals carried the line ‘My Goodness, My Guinness’.

1936 First Guinness brewery outside Dublin built at Park Royal, London.

1950 5 million pints of Guinness enjoyed every day

1955 First Guinness Book of Records was published.

1959 Draught Guinness first introduced.

1962 First Guinness overseas brewery outside the British Isles was opened in Nigeria. Breweries in Malaysia, Jamaica, Ghana and Cameroon followed.

1988 Draught Guinness in a can launched, using a widget to recreate the creamy surge. Won the Queen’s award for technological achievement in 1991.

1999 Guinness Draught in Bottle launched.

2000 Guinness Storehouse, Home of Guinness, opened to the public.

2008 10 million glasses of Guinness are enjoyed in over 150 countries around the world.

2013 Guinness remains a premium product that is sold in most countries around the world, yet millions of overseas travelers come to Ireland each and every year to enjoy Guinness in its natural habitat, there is no Guinness like Guinness sipped in the surrounds of the seas and landscapes of Ireland’s shores, complimented with fine Irish food grown in Irish soil that is rich in vitamins and minerals. Many firmly believe that a Guinness a Day will keep the Doctor away.

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Dublin Zoo News

Kafi the gorilla settles in at Dublin Zoo

Dublin Zoo is celebrating the arrival of Kafi, a three year old female western lowland gorilla. Kafi arrived to the Gorilla Rainforest at Dublin Zoo in August 2012 and since then Kafi has been  undergoing the careful process of being introduced to the Dublin Zoo gorilla troop, who include Harry, the silverback, Lena, Mayani and two youngsters Kituba and Kambiri.

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Dublinzoo
Dublin Zoo

Kafi’s Story

Kafi’s story began as a sad one with the loss of her mother at the tender age of just five months. Due to this loss, Kafi was hand reared by the animal care team in a gorilla nursery at Stuttgart Zoo in Germany. After a number of months Kafi gained strength and independence and was old enough to be integrated back with her own species, so she moved to join a troop of gorillas in Romagne Zoo in France.

Unfortunately this integration was unsuccessful for Kafi, who once again found herself without a family.

However in 2011 a new opportunity arose for Kafi in the newly opened Gorilla Rainforest at Dublin Zoo. This truly world-class habitat, which was home to a breeding and well adapted group of western lowland gorillas, meant there may be hope for the orphaned gorilla.

Not only could Dublin Zoo provide a stimulating habitat, it also had an animal care team with a proven track record of successfully integrating a hand reared female gorilla into the troop.

In August 2012, Kafi arrived to the Gorilla Rainforest and the team began the careful process of introducing her to the troop of five gorillas. The first step was visual presentation; a few months later the young gorilla was introduced into the habitat to interact with the other gorillas.

Ciaran McMahon, team leader for the gorillas commented, “After months of careful introduction Kafi has settled in very well. Luckily Lena, who is a fantastic mother with sharp maternal instincts, took Kafi under her wing indicating her approval to the other gorillas.

“Kafi is a beautiful and very intelligent young gorilla. Since arriving she has learned amazing social skills and knows how to interact with the others, especially silverback Harry. The youngster is comfortable but still cautious and spends a lot of time playing with the other young gorillas, Kituba aged two and Kimbiri aged one and a half years.” 

He continued, “We are extremely proud to have successfully integrated Kafi with the group. It is a phenomenal experience and great achievement. We still keep a very close eye on the troop and how they interact with each other. Once Kafi matures we hope that she will join the breeding programme and contribute to the survival of this highly endangered species of western lowland gorillas.”

Follow Kafi’s story on The Zoo brought to you in association with EBS, on RTÉ One.

Visitors can say hi to Kafi who can be seen out and about with Harry, Lena, Mayani, Kituba and Kambiri in the Gorilla Rainforest, proudly sponsored by Freddy Fyffes.

Dublin Zoo, Zoo Dublin, Accommodation near Dublin Zoo, Dublin Guesthouse, Dublin Hotel, Cheap Hotel, Cheap city centre accommodation

Stars of Australian soap, Home and Away, Luke Mitchell who plays Romeo and Rebecca Breeds who plays Ruby pictured feeding the penguins April 2013 at Dublin Zoo. The pair were celebrating their honeymoon in Ireland after they married. FORGET holidaying on an exotic island – for ‘Home and Away’ actors Luke Mitchell and Rebecca Breeds the ultimate honeymoon experience is a romantic trip to Dublin Zoo.

dublinzoo
Dublin Zoo

Dublin Zoo was opened in 1831 by the then Royal Zoological Society of Ireland, which had been founded the previous year. The animals were supplied by its counterpart in the UK, London Zoo.

zoo dublin
zoo dublin

Like other Zoos of this time, Dublin Zoo was nothing like it is today. Its purpose was to show as many different kinds of animals as possible to people who had never seen anything like it.

Our Zoo has had a long and fascinating history – here are just some highlights from the first hundred years.

Timeline

1833 The entrance lodge to the Zoo was built for £30! You can still see it today!

1838 To celebrate Queen Victoria’s Coronation the Zoo held an open day – 20,000 people visited, which is still the highest number of visitors in one day.

1844 The Zoo received its first giraffe

1855 The Zoo bought its first pair of lions. These bred for the first time in 1857.

1868-9 An aquarium, a lion house and the Society House (which still stands) built with funds from a government grant.

1876 Reptiles shared the aquarium; it officially became the reptile house in the 1890s

1898 Haughton House opened, providing tea rooms for members upstairs and animal enclosures downstairs.

1916 Getting in and out of Phoenix Park became difficult during the Easter Rising and meat ran out. In order to keep the lions and tigers fed, some of the other animals in the zoo were killed!

1939-1945 During World War II the popularity of the Zoo soared despite the difficulty in replacing animals that died. The public donated food for the animals and, after the war when fuel was still difficult to acquire, trees were chopped down to heat the houses.

Today there are still parts of the zoo that date back to the very beginning – why not come along and see them yourself.

Dublin Zoo is much more than a fun-filled; stimulating day out for all the family… it’s a place to learn about wild animals, especially those which are endangered. The Zoo is a registered charity – your visit will help maintain Dublin Zoo to a high standard, improve the Zoo and contribute to conservation programmes.

Located in the Phoenix Park in the heart of Dublin city, Dublin Zoo is Ireland’s most popular family attraction, and welcomed over one million visitors last year.

As one of the world’s oldest, yet popular zoos, the 28 hectare park in the heart of Dublin is home to some 400 animals in safe environment where education and conservation combine for an exciting and unforgettable experience!

The distinguishing characteristic of mammals is that the mother nourishes newborn young with milk produced by special glands. Mammals also have several other distinguishing features. Hair is common among mammals and can take many forms, including whiskers, spines and fur. All mammals breathe air so even those living in water e.g. whales must surface to take a breath.

Like birds, all mammals are warm-blooded. That means they generate their own body heat through metabolism, and can thus stay warmer than their surroundings, day or night, sun or shade. Mammals can be carnivores, herbivores, insectivores, fruitivores or omnivores. There are approximately 5,400 species of mammals, this also includes humans.

Birds are warm-blooded vertebrates that are well adapted for flight, though not all birds can fly.  All birds are covered with feathers, contain a strong skeleton, and have efficient digestive and respiratory systems.  There are about 10,000 species ranging from very small to very large.

Reptiles: Instead of hair or feathers, reptiles are covered with scales that keep them from drying out. They are cold-blooded, so they must move between sun and shade to regulate their body temperature.  Unlike mammalian young, who are dependent upon their mothers for some time after birth, most reptiles are independent from day one. There are more than 6,500 reptile species

Amphibians are cold-blooded vertebrates that are able to breathe through their skin.  There are about 6,000 species of amphibians.   Amphibians can live both in fresh water and on land, although all amphibian species depend upon water for reproduction and to keep their skin moist. They range in size from frogs less than a half-inch long, to a giant salamanders that reach 1.5 metres in length.

Invertebrates are the most abundant creatures on the planet — comprising more than 97% of all known animal species. By definition, an invertebrate is an animal without a backbone. That includes jellyfish, insects, worms, snails, lobsters, and spiders.

Hours and Rates

Dublin Zoo is open from 9.30am daily

Prices

Adult €16.00

Child

€11.50

Child under 3 Free

Senior Citizens €12.50

dublin zoo ireland
dublin zoo ireland
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Allianz Hurling League Final 2013

 

Allianz Hurling League Final, Nowlan Park, Kilkenny v Tipperrary, GAA Fixtures

Anchor House Dublin for all your Croke Park Accommodation needs

Nowlan Park to rock again as final makes welcome return

Bruce Springsteen has already sold out two dates there at the end of the July, and now Kilkenny and Tipperary are set to do likewise.

With the main Ardan de Gras (new stand) already sold out, Sunday’s Allianz Hurling League final at Nowlan Park is on course to draw a capacity crowd of around 24,000 – partly explained by the novelty and setting of the Kilkenny venue.

Indeed it’s staged more concerts in recent years than major GAA matches, with Andrea Bocelli, Rod Stewart, Bob Dylan, Dolly Parton, and Paul Simon among those to perform at Nowlan Park, and Springsteen’s two shows – the climax of his Wrecking Ball European tour – could have sold out several times over.

Nowlan Park, however, is not a complete stranger to hurling league finals – having played host three times in the past: in 1966, Kilkenny beat New York in the second leg (the first leg was played in Croke Park) of the final; in 1959 Tipperary beat Waterford there, while in 1933, Kilkenny beat Limerick. Indeed both of Sunday’s finalists already have experience of winning the league title in Nowlan Park.

So attractive

What makes Nowlan Park so attractive, says Kilkenny’s six-time All-Ireland winner Eddie Keher, is the tightness of the seating arrangements: together with the Ardan de Gras, the Ardan Breathnach (old stand) and the new Ardan O Cearbhaill (and the so-called county end) seat around 17,000, making it one of the GAA’s largest seating capacities outside of Croke Park.

“Isn’t it wonderful?” says Keher. “We’ve played league finals in Thurles, a great atmosphere, and Kilkenny love playing in Thurles as well, but this is something special, one of the biggest seating venues after Croke Park in Leinster.

“The new stand there, at the country end of the pitch, as we call it, I’d hope will be full. If that is full I think there’ll be a huge crowd and I think that will create a great atmosphere for both Kilkenny and Tipperary supporters.

“And I know it’s everyone’s dream is to play in Croke Park, particularly new players, who relish getting the chance to play at Croke Park. But I think league matches, or the earlier rounds of the championship, provide a better atmosphere, with the full house rather than sort of a sparse crowd, or well, a good crowd that looks sparse in Croke Park. So I would like to see maybe more counties having a home and away agreement, as we have in Tipperary. We’ll go there, they go to us, in important matches.”

Reigning champions

Kilkenny, as reigning champions, are bidding to take the title for the 16th time while Tipperary can extend their lead having already won the title 19 times.

Unfortunately one man who won’t be there on Sunday is Kilkenny manager Brian Cody, as he continues to recover from minor cardiac surgery. Yet Keher has no doubt Cody will be back as soon as he’s fit and able.

“And I’m sure he’ll be there in spirit, and that he’ll have a part to play at some stage. I don’t know what’s happening but I can imagine him keeping totally away from it. He’ll be missed on the sidelines he has done a fantastic job with that team Allianz Hurling League Final, Nowlan Park, Kilkenny v Tipperrary, GAA Fixtures

Nowlan Park to rock again as final makes welcome return

Bruce Springsteen has already sold out two dates there at the end of the July, and now Kilkenny and Tipperary are set to do likewise.

With the main Ardan de Gras (new stand) already sold out, Sunday’s Allianz Hurling League final at Nowlan Park is on course to draw a capacity crowd of around 24,000 – partly explained by the novelty and setting of the Kilkenny venue.

Indeed it’s staged more concerts in recent years than major GAA matches, with Andrea Bocelli, Rod Stewart, Bob Dylan, Dolly Parton, and Paul Simon among those to perform at Nowlan Park, and Springsteen’s two shows – the climax of his Wrecking Ball European tour – could have sold out several times over.

Nowlan Park, however, is not a complete stranger to hurling league finals – having played host three times in the past: in 1966, Kilkenny beat New York in the second leg (the first leg was played in Croke Park) of the final; in 1959 Tipperary beat Waterford there, while in 1933, Kilkenny beat Limerick. Indeed both of Sunday’s finalists already have experience of winning the league title in Nowlan Park.

So attractive

What makes Nowlan Park so attractive, says Kilkenny’s six-time All-Ireland winner Eddie Keher, is the tightness of the seating arrangements: together with the Ardan de Gras, the Ardan Breathnach (old stand) and the new Ardan O Cearbhaill (and the so-called county end) seat around 17,000, making it one of the GAA’s largest seating capacities outside of Croke Park.

“Isn’t it wonderful?” says Keher. “We’ve played league finals in Thurles, a great atmosphere, and Kilkenny love playing in Thurles as well, but this is something special, one of the biggest seating venues after Croke Park in Leinster.

“The new stand there, at the country end of the pitch, as we call it, I’d hope will be full. If that is full I think there’ll be a huge crowd and I think that will create a great atmosphere for both Kilkenny and Tipperary supporters.

“And I know it’s everyone’s dream is to play in Croke Park, particularly new players, who relish getting the chance to play at Croke Park. But I think league matches, or the earlier rounds of the championship, provide a better atmosphere, with the full house rather than sort of a sparse crowd, or well, a good crowd that looks sparse in Croke Park. So I would like to see maybe more counties having a home and away agreement, as we have in Tipperary. We’ll go there, they go to us, in important matches.”

Reigning champions

Kilkenny, as reigning champions, are bidding to take the title for the 16th time while Tipperary can extend their lead having already won the title 19 times.

Unfortunately one man who won’t be there on Sunday is Kilkenny manager Brian Cody, as he continues to recover from minor cardiac surgery. Yet Keher has no doubt Cody will be back as soon as he’s fit and able.

“And I’m sure he’ll be there in spirit, and that he’ll have a part to play at some stage. I don’t know what’s happening but I can imagine him keeping totally away from it. He’ll be missed on the sidelines he has done a fantastic job with that team over the years. We all wish him the best.”

Also missing on Sunday is Henry Shefflin, as he continues his comeback from an ankle injury and while Keher is confident he too will be back sooner rather than later, he doesn’t believe Shefflin is chasing the record of never missing a senior championship game under Cody.

“From talking to him recently I’d say – even though he didn’t say it – that he’s gearing himself to try and be back for the championship. If anyone will get back Henry will get back. Even if he doesn’t make the first match hopefully he can go on from there. Despite what it seems with that Kilkenny team I don’t think records motivate them.”

over the years. We all wish him the best.”

Also missing on Sunday is Henry Shefflin, as he continues his comeback from an ankle injury and while Keher is confident he too will be back sooner rather than later, he doesn’t believe Shefflin is chasing the record of never missing a senior championship game under Cody.

“From talking to him recently I’d say – even though he didn’t say it – that he’s gearing himself to try and be back for the championship. If anyone will get back Henry will get back. Even if he doesn’t make the first match hopefully he can go on from there. Despite what it seems with that Kilkenny team I don’t think records motivate them.”

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2015 RUGBY WORLD CUP FIXTURES

 

2015 RUGBY WORLD CUP FIXTURES, Irish rugby fixtures, Irish rugby team, rugby Ireland, rugby squad, Irish rugby world cup team 2015

Ireland will take on Italy at the Olympic Stadium in London as one of four pool games played at the venue during the 2015 World Cup.

The game against the Italians is scheduled for Sunday October 4th, with Ireland’s four games in Pool D all taking place on weekend dates.

Ireland open with a a game against the top qualifier from the Americas section at the Millennium Stadium on Saturday September 19th, with the USA and Canada set to battle it out for top spot in that qualifier.

Wembley will host the meeting between Ireland and the second qualifier from Europe before the game against Italy on October 4th. Georgia and Romania currently top the European qualifying rankings.

Ireland will return to Cardiff for the the big Pool D clash against France at the Millennium Stadium on Sunday October 11th.

Qualification from Pool D as winner or runner-up would see Ireland staying in Cardiff for a quarter-final clash against a side from Group C, which includes defending champions New Zealand and Argentina. Both semi-finals and the final will take place at Twickenham.

Cardiff will have a capacity of just over 74,000 for the tournament, while Wembley will be the biggest of the 13 stadia being used for the tournament, with a 90,000 capacity. The Olympic Stadium will hold 54,000 spectators for the tournament.

England will play three of their pool matches at Twickenham, including the opening game against likely Oceania qualifiers Fiji.

Stuart Lancaster’s men will also take on Wales and Australia at their traditional home before heading north to play the final Pool A qualifier at Manchester City’s Etihad Stadium.

Wales will play their games against the two qualifiers at the Millennium Stadium but their pivotal fixtures against England and Australia will both be at Twickenham.

Scotland open with a midweek game but will be close to home when they take on South Africa and Samoa, with the fixtures scheduled for Newcastle’s St James’ Park.

New Zealand open the defence of their title against Argentina at Wembley.

2015 RUGBY WORLD CUP FIXTURES

Fri Sep 18 – Pool A: England v Oceania 1, Twickenham Stadium 
Sat Sep 19 – Pool C:
 Tonga v Europe 1, Kingsholm Stadium 
Sat Sep 19 – Pool D:
 IRELAND v Americas 1, Millennium Stadium 
Sat Sep 19 – Pool B:
 South Africa v Asia 1, Brighton Community Stadium 
Sat Sep 19 – Pool D: 
France v Italy, Twickenham Stadium 
Sun Sep 20 – Pool B: 
Samoa v Americas 2, Brighton Community Stadium 
Sun Sep 20 – Pool C:
 New Zealand v Argentina, Wembley Stadium 
Sun Sep 20 – Pool A:
 Wales v Play-off winner, Millennium Stadium 
Wed Sep 23 – Pool B:
 Scotland v Asia 1, Kingsholm Stadium 
Wed Sep 23 – Pool A:
 Australia v Oceania 1, Millennium Stadium 
Wed Sep 23 – Pool D: 
France v Europe 2, Olympic Stadium 
Thu Sep 24 – Pool C:
 New Zealand v Africa 1, Olympic Stadium 
Fri Sep 25 – Pool C:
 Argentina v Europe 1, Kingsholm Stadium 
Sat Sep 26 – Pool D: 
Italy v Americas 1, Elland Road 
Sat Sep 26 – Pool B: 
South Africa v Samoa, Villa Park 
Sat Sep 26 – Pool A: 
England v Wales, Twickenham Stadium 
Sun Sep 27 – Pool A:
 Australia v Play-off winner, Villa Park 
Sun Sep 27 – Pool B:
 Scotland v Americas 2, Elland Road 
Sun Sep 27 – Pool D: IRELAND v Europe 2, Wembley Stadium
 
Tue Sep 29 – Pool C:
 Tonga v Africa 1, Sandy Park 
Thu Oct 1 – Pool D: 
France v Americas 1, stadiummk 
Thu Oct 1 – Pool A:
 Wales v Oceania 1, Millennium Stadium 
Fri Oct 2 – Pool C:
 New Zealand v Europe 1, Millennium Stadium 
Sat Oct 3 – Pool B:
 Samoa v Asia 1, stadiummk 
Sat Oct 3 – Pool B:
 South Africa v Scotland, St James’ Park 
Sat Oct 3 – Pool A: 
England v Australia, Twickenham Stadium 
Sun Oct 4 – Pool C:
 Argentina v Tonga, Leicester City Stadium 
Sun Oct 4 – Pool D: IRELAND v Italy, Olympic Stadium
 
Tue Oct 6 – Pool D:
 Americas 1 v Europe 2, Leicester City Stadium 
Tue Oct 6 – Pool A:
 Oceania 1 v Play-off winner, stadiummk 
Wed Oct 7 – Pool C:
 Africa 1 v Europe 1, Sandy Park 
Wed Oct 7 – Pool B: 
South Africa v Americas 2, Olympic Stadium 
Fri Oct 9 – Pool C:
 New Zealand v Tonga, St James’ Park 
Sat Oct 10 – Pool B:
 Samoa v Scotland, St James’ Park 
Sat Oct 10 – Pool A:
 Australia v Wales, Twickenham Stadium 
Sat Oct 10 – Pool A:
 England v Play-off winner, Manchester City Stadium 
Sun Oct 11 – Pool D:
 Italy v Europe 2, Sandy Park 
Sun Oct 11 – Pool B:
 Americas 2 v Asia 1, Kingsholm Stadium 
Sun Oct 11 – Pool C:
 Argentina v Africa 1, Leicester City Stadium 
Sun Oct 11 – Pool D: France v IRELAND, Millennium Stadium
 
Sat Oct 17 – Quarter-Final 1:
 Winner Pool C v Runner-Up Pool D , Millennium
Stadium 
Sat Oct 17 – Quarter-Final 2:
 Winner Pool B v Runner-Up Pool A, Twickenham Stadium 
Sun Oct 18 – Quarter-Final 3:
 Winner Pool D v Runner-Up Pool C, Millennium Stadium 
Sun Oct 18 – Quarter-Final 4:
 Winner Pool A v Runner-Up Pool B, Twickenham Stadium 
Sat Oct 24 – Semi-Final 1:
 Winner QF1 v W QF2 Twickenham Stadium 
Sun Oct 25 – Semi-Final 2:
 Winner QF3 v W QF4 Twickenham Stadium 
Fri Oct 30 – Bronze Final:
 Olympic Stadium 
Sat Oct 31 – Final:
 Twickenham Stadium

see also Gardiner Street Dublin

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